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Moms Offer Life's Lessons

May 14, 2013 - Jane Whitmore
Mother’s Day gives us the opportunity to reflect on motherhood and remember all of the sage advice our mothers handed down over the years. We refer to “life’s lessons” and it seems most moms are on the same track. Columnist Bryan Golden offered ten points of wisdom. He acknowledges that most are too young to appreciate the value of these valuable lessons when handed down by Mom, but we are sure to remember them when we become parents. Here are Golden’s “Life’s Lessons from Your Mother:” • You can be whatever you want to be. • Be nice to your friends and they will be nice to you. • Do your homework and you will get good grades. • Clean your room now. • You can play once your chores are done. • Stay in school. • Sticks and stones will break your bones but names will never hurt you. • Don’t waste your time. • Be thankful for what you have. • Don’t complain. We can all relate to these sage lessons and embellish each one with our own experiences. In our home we?learned those same lessons, plus some: • We learned to chew with our mouths closed and not talk with food in our mouths. • We learned to communicate with good grammar and were corrected when we erred. • We learned to smile and speak to the people in our community as we walked down the street. • We learned good manners and were taught to have respect for others. Life has changed. Probably due to “common usage” it has become okay to hover over smart phones during dinner and not communicate with anyone. Then who could tell if we’re chewing with our mouths open? We aren’t talking...at all. We fracture the English language, again due to common usage. Words you cannot find in Webster’s dictionary will pop up in an urban dictionary. We speak as we “text,” in short non-sentences. How will our young people prepare a resume? Did you know it takes fewer muscles to smile than it does to frown??Even if that statement isn’t totally accurate, that’s what we were taught. Our parents always encouraged us to smile and to speak to our friends and neighbors. “Please” and “Thank You” are two of the most important words you can say. These two polite terms are easy to remember and easy to say. They show respect. We must remember to respect others -- respect their opinions and respect their property. Go back to the list of ten and see how many apply: be nice to your friends -- sticks and stones -- be thankful -- don’t complain. We don’t have to wait for Mother’s Day or Father’s Day to remember life’s lessons. We live those lessons every day. And, hopefully, we pass along positive lessons to our children and grandchildren. Mother’s Day gives us the opportunity to reflect on motherhood and remember all of the sage advice our mothers handed down over the years. We refer to “life’s lessons” and it seems most moms are on the same track. Columnist Bryan Golden offered ten points of wisdom. He acknowledges that most are too young to appreciate the value of these valuable lessons when handed down by Mom, but we are sure to remember them when we become parents. Here are Golden’s “Life’s Lessons from Your Mother:” • You can be whatever you want to be. • Be nice to your friends and they will be nice to you. • Do your homework and you will get good grades. • Clean your room now. • You can play once your chores are done. • Stay in school. • Sticks and stones will break your bones but names will never hurt you. • Don’t waste your time. • Be thankful for what you have. • Don’t complain. We can all relate to these sage lessons and embellish each one with our own experiences. In our home we?learned those same lessons, plus some: • We learned to chew with our mouths closed and not talk with food in our mouths. • We learned to communicate with good grammar and were corrected when we erred. • We learned to smile and speak to the people in our community as we walked down the street. • We learned good manners and were taught to have respect for others. Life has changed. Probably due to “common usage” it has become okay to hover over smart phones during dinner and not communicate with anyone. Then who could tell if we’re chewing with our mouths open? We aren’t talking...at all. We fracture the English language, again due to common usage. Words you cannot find in Webster’s dictionary will pop up in an urban dictionary. We speak as we “text,” in short non-sentences. How will our young people prepare a resume? Did you know it takes fewer muscles to smile than it does to frown??Even if that statement isn’t totally accurate, that’s what we were taught. Our parents always encouraged us to smile and to speak to our friends and neighbors. “Please” and “Thank You” are two of the most important words you can say. These two polite terms are easy to remember and easy to say. They show respect. We must remember to respect others -- respect their opinions and respect their property. Go back to the list of ten and see how many apply: be nice to your friends -- sticks and stones -- be thankful -- don’t complain. We don’t have to wait for Mother’s Day or Father’s Day to remember life’s lessons. We live those lessons every day. And, hopefully, we pass along positive lessons to our children and grandchildren.

 
 

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